April 5, 2016

Let’s Talk About:

One Language to Rule Them All

JavaScript, the former laughing stock of programming languages, has grown up big time. If you still see it as that adolescent scripting language meant only for moving elements around on a webpage, you're in for a rude awakening.

Love it or hate it, JavaScript is taking over the software world...and quickly.

Today's JavaScript is used to build web appsdesktop appsserver-side apps, and mobile apps. The dream of one language for all platforms is finally coming true. Writing for all platforms in a single language holds the promise of terrific efficiency gains amongst development teams formerly fragmented by language. It's never been easier to make stunning experiences on every possible screen.

An improved language specification, terrific new developer tooling, and a growing list of high quality, corporation-backed open-source projects have all contributed to the language's meteoric rise among developers.

JavaScript may not be the best language out there, but watch out; it's poised to quickly become the most important.

Browse Viget's Open-Source JS

Community Thoughts on One Language to Rule Them All...

  1. 1. JavaScript: The Good Parts Fortunately, JavaScript has some extraordinarily good parts. In JavaScript, there is a beautiful, elegant, highly expressive language that is buried under a steaming pile of good intentions and blunders.
  2. 2. Forget the Click Bait. Here’s What the JavaScript Job Market Really Looks Like in 2016. JavaScript is currently the most popular programming language with the richest OSS module ecosystem, and the only programming language with a really convincing universal deployment story: The “write once, run everywhere” dream that Java aspired to — Java fell short. JavaScript pulled it off.
  3. 3. What To Expect From JavaScript In 2016 – Beyond the Browser At Facebook, we need to implement the exact same feature 3 times: for Web, iOS and Android. Even worse, because it’s so hard for one engineer to get ramped up in those ecosystems, we usually have 3 people implementing that feature. This is sad.In order to solve that, my intuition is that there needs to be a single language/ecosystem. With React Native we opted for JavaScript but in the grand scheme of things it doesn’t matter which language it is. What’s most important is that there is only one.
  4. 4. Progressive Enhancement: Zed’s Dead, Baby We live in a time where you can assume JavaScript is part of the web platform. Worrying about browsers without JavaScript is like worrying about whether you’re backwards compatible with HTML 3.2 or CSS2. At some point, you have to accept that some things are just part of the platform. Drawing the line at JavaScript is an arbitrary delineation that doesn’t match the state of browsers in 2013.

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